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Writing Tips - L.A. Fields

I've been asked to share some author tips, and so here they are, three pieces of advice: Writing Tips - L.A. Fields

(Ignore that living in Texas bit; I don't really live here, I simply exist here, serving time like one does in prison, against one's will.)

Anyway, for you TL;DR types of readers, the short version of those tips is:

1. Listen to me.
2. Are you listening?
3. Don't listen to me.

That's good advice if you want to take it!

Learn about Loeb and Leopold

There is a new Leopold and Loeb website! I could have used this while writing Homo Superiors, but the next author of an L/L representation will have it all at their fingertips. I'm the most recent feature at the end of the fiction page . . . for now.

My short story collection Countrycide is $1 in ebook version all week: here.

Homo Superiors is on the radar for another review: here.

Read my books! Some of them, all of them, throw a dart at the stack and choose that way or go with the cheapest, that’s up to you, but get on it.

Homo Superiors: Audiobook

The audiobook for Homo Superiors is out today!

Listen up!

Homo Superiors: the Fan Playlist Edition

A fellow Leopold and Loeb devotee/fan of my interpretation, Homo Superiors, has put together a playlist. From the title's song origin to the list content, I agree! Here are the fan-songs, plus a secret blog-bonus Easter egg below them (the songs I listened to while writing the book in the first place):

Such Strange Little Birds
(title from "Even Though Our Love Is Doomed" - Garbage)

"Oh! You Pretty Things" - David Bowie

"That’s My Boy" - VAST

"Perfect" - Alanis Morissette

"Paper Planes" - M.I.A.

"Add It Up" - Richard Cheese

"Rich Kids Blues" - Lykke Li

"I Think I Found the Culprit" - Jack White

"Lurk" - The Neighbourhood

***

"Oh, You Pretty Things!" is where the book's title came from (you know, Nietzsche by way of Bowie), so that's a crossover tune, and the ones on repeat as I wrote:

"Birds of Hell Awaiting" and "Killing Strangers" - Marilyn Manson

"Pups to Dust" - Modest Mouse

SO: now I have a few new songs to go interrogate until they're memorized. What a wonderful chore!
Here's another review for Homo Superiors, and it's a good one.

Highly intelligent Noah and Ray are quintessential "frienemies" in this gripping modern day retelling of Leopold and Loeb.

My favorite part of this review is that it realizes the boys are equals; not everyone understands that each part of this duo gives up as much as he demands, but this analysis does. They don't really trust or even like each other that much, yet they depend on each other, desperately. That's the trick to them, yeah.

The fresh, witty albeit perverse dialogue between Noah and Ray keeps the pages turning, and while it's easy to sense their story will undoubtedly end badly, you can't help but wonder what deplorable act they'll come up with next.

Guest author L.A. Fields - Interview

Homo Superiors comes out later this week (final edits are sent to print; it's as pristine as it can be), and in this interview I talk about its inspiration, my long-standing Disorder Series, why I write, what I do for money, and what I'll be working on next.

Originally posted by charliecochrane at post



Delighted to have fellow Lethe author LA Fields here today, having my author questions inflicted on her.

What inspired you to start writing?

It was a whim a time or two when I was young, but once I hit about twelve, I found fanfiction and have been writing ever since. I quit fanfiction by age sixteen and started writing original stories, but then again one of my more recent books is a Sherlock Holmes pastiche, and just because it’s a fancy word doesn’t mean it’s not still fanfiction. The most recent book is a thinly veiled real-person fanfiction at the most basic level: a retelling of the infamous Leopold and Loeb crime. Again, in-depth research doesn’t save it from being fanfic. The writing matures but the drive behind it never does: I like something, I want to spend a year reinventing it, I don’t know where that compulsion comes from, but I don’t fight it; it’s my favorite thing about me.

Do you have another job (paid or otherwise) apart from being an author? If so, how do you juggle your time?

Yeah, right now I’m basically a secretary (I’m A.E. Housman in the Patent Office after getting burned out of school; he failed his final exams, I had to leave a PhD program because it gave me nothing but an abusive poverty stipend, and required more pointless work and endless teaching than would ever pay off with the horrible adjunctification of higher ed). I do some copywriting for this job, I’ll segue myself into better-paying copywriting gigs when I can, but the job I have now has a lot of free time trapped at a computer, so I get in daily writing quotas at my desk.

Right now I also spend three weeks a month ghostwriting smut stories for someone else’s Amazon self-pub penname, and I’ll do that until I’m out of debt from the den of thieves that was grad school. I spend the fourth week of each month writing a chapter of my next book, my eighth. If I factor in the word count of the ghostwriting gig, I’ve written at least two more books, but the filler-foam-peanut writing I do purely for money doesn’t count to me the same way, not for copywriting or ghostwriting. I’ve got these pesky principles about the difference between what is profitable and what is valuable, and I can’t seem to shake those things off.

What did it feel like watching your first book fledge and leave the nest?

I have felt irrationally immortal and superior ever since! It changed me from a wannabe into a writer, and I’ve never felt like a fraud for even a minute since then when it comes to writing fiction. Now that book is ten years old, and it’s like having a diary from childhood that I can unearth and treasure whenever I think something from my past is lost or unrecorded. Nothing is lost because I put it into a book; I love that thing. And I love who I was when I made it: so unaware of what life would bring, but still with the weird power of pattern and prophesy. I knew myself pretty well, I just didn’t know what that would do to me once I got out into the world. That first book was written when I was 18, I plan to finish writing the series before I’m 30, so I can seal up my extreme youth in that time capsule I call The Disorder Series.

Are you character or plot driven? What do you do if one of your characters starts developing at a tangent?

Character driven; I don’t even like plots, I skim them in other books; plots are only devices to reveal and showcase character for me. If a character starts developing weird, I either don’t have my head in the game and I’m not really invested in who or why they are, or they’re right and they’ve just surprised me (which is the best—only Pygmalion and Gepetto know how amazing that feels better than I do). It’s happened to me recently, in fact, with the intended end of The Disorder Series; it’s not going to end like I thought it would when I was a teenager, but then the characters aren’t teenagers anymore either, and they’re also a little disturbed by what’s happened to them, and how they’ve adapted to it. That series has always been about weird adaptation and survival, so it’s fitting.

What inspired this book?

This new book, Homo Superiors? A pointless murder inspired this one. I got interested in Leopold and Loeb when I was fourteen, the age of their victim, and it’s been an interest I’ve held for more than a decade since. They’re part of the reason I moved to Chicago for a few years, so I could visit the case-related graves in Rosehill Cemetery, and know the place where they lived. By the time I was experienced enough at writing and research to do justice to my obsession with these two killers, the full transcripts of the trial and psych reports were online, and that’s about 4,500 pages of prime source material (without the moral or social slants all the other treatments of the case often bring to the L/L canon).

That infamous case, with so many points of scandal and outrage, has always been treated more for its courtroom spectacle than its origins. The big question with such a senseless ‘thrill kill’ is why. I know why, and that’s the reason I wrote my book. No one else has thought of it quite like I do. For example: I had to dig deep to find out what exactly killed Nathan Leopold’s mother when he was sixteen; that’s not irrelevant when it comes to how a young man’s life takes such a horrifying turn. The best representation so far is John Logan’s Never the Sinner—that play (though I’ve only read it and never seen it performed) does an amazing job of dicing the public and private aspects of the case into a tight story, giving equal time and importance to both sides. My book goes way far in the private direction; I don’t even touch the case or the fallout. My book is about how two boys went from wunderkinds to killers. That’s my fascination, and so that’s where I’ve focused.

If you had no constraints of time and a guarantee of publication, what book would you write?

I kind of do have that. I have as much time outside of work as I want to spend on writing, and my publishers rarely turn me down. The next idea I’m excited about is a collaboration with my best friend (all we know about it now is that it’ll be a Murder Book of some sort); it would be nice to really invest in something like that, with all the research and refining and revising that I usually do in very minimal, organized amounts when I’m the sole author. What happens to that when I’m working with someone else? I want to find out, and for sure it’ll produce a unique kind of book that I could never accomplish alone.

Is there a classic book you started and simply couldn't finish?

The first book I ever quit was Great Expectations, and I know enough after two decades spent as an English major that it’s a pretty ironic one to ditch. BUT: Dickens was paid by word quantity, and so am I with my ghostwriting gig, so I know good and goddamn well how much of those Dickensian behemoths are filler for the sake of paying bills. I’m okay with Dickens, writer to writer and shill to shill, but I don’t like his work and I won’t try to read any more of it.

What’s your favourite gay romance/other genre book? And why?

I love books with gay characters, but almost never pure romance. I think most fictional romance is boring, happy endings are boring, but I do have an answer: Poppy Z. Brite’s Exquisite Corpse. You want genre, we’ve got horror: there are serial killers targeting gay men; some of those killers are other humans, but one of them is a plague. You want romance, we’ve got that too, kind of: with one couple we have murder husbands the likes of which mere Hannibal fans have barely seen (talk about real-person fanfiction—what if Jeffrey Dahmer and Dennis Nilsen had met? They’d certainly have a lot to talk about), with the other couple you get nothing but the B-side of romance, the passionate aftermath (they’re broken up from page one to done, but the relationship was so intense that neither man is truly out of it; they can’t stop thinking about the other). That’s the kind of romance I like to see: intoxicating, destructive, undeniable. True love! Not at all a guarantee of happy endings, but worth it every time.

What's your next project?

Finish my youthful Disorder Series, then an annotated edition of America’s first gay novel, then the Murder Book collaboration with my friend, and then an existential crisis because I don’t know what comes after that. Probably a break-down or an overdose or a mid-life crisis; I’ll worry about that if/when I actually run out of projects and can’t come up with any more.

Homo Superiors

Countrycide: Review

A new review of my short story collection Countrycide has gone live! My thoughts:

- You can shrug more than shoulders, you can shrug eyebrows, and hands, but I've taken enough creative writing classes to know that a lot people are insisting on grammar rules that don't need to be insisted upon, so c'est la vie.

- The order of the stories has turned off more than one reader, this is true, but I like to lead with my strongest (i.e. most disturbing) foot.

- In grad school an interconnected short story collection is called 'a novel in stories.' Regarding this book, by whatever name we call it, the reviewer says, Fields’ ability to write these little vignettes with the same men and women popping up here and there and allowing personal growth is incredible. I agree, I'm a huge fan of myself.

- The reviewer has picked an excellent favorite line, go see what it is! It sums up the feel of the collection pretty well; that line is what it's all about.

Homo Superiors - First Advance Review!

The Advance Reading Copies went out, and now the first review is in for Homo Superiors from Windy City Reviews, check it out!

A result of knowing these characters so intimately is that the reader is able to make a few concessions when the boys act up in their teens. Normally in literature, it’s quite a challenge to get a reader to support protagonists who commit crimes, especially as casually as these two do, but Fields woos the reader into the characters’ court quite successfully.

The short version: Those who enjoy a good psychological drama should be satisfied.

Profile

L.A. Fields
la_fields
L.A. Fields
L.A. Fields is the author of The Disorder Series, the short story collection Countrycide, the Lambda Award finalist My Dear Watson, and Homo Superiors, a modern retelling of Chicago's Leopold and Loeb crime.

She has a BA in English Literature from the New College of Florida, and an MFA in Creative Writing - Fiction from Columbia College Chicago. She lives in Dallas, TX with a cat and a day job.

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